UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
ý
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2019
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from  ___ to ___.
Commission File No. 001-37392
Apollo Medical Holdings, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation or organization)
95-4472349
(IRS Employer Identification No.)
1668 S. Garfield Avenue, 2nd Floor, Alhambra, California 91801
(Address of principal executive offices and zip code)
(626) 282-0288
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code) 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days:   ý   Yes     ¨    No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).   ý   Yes     ¨    No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer ¨
Accelerated filer x
Non-accelerated filer ¨
Smaller reporting company ¨
 
Emerging growth company ¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act):  ¨    Yes     ý    No
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Trading Symbol
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share
 
AMEH
 
Nasdaq Capital Market
As of November 4, 2019, there were 34,892,506 shares of common stock of the registrant, $0.001 par value per share, issued and outstanding.
 



APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
INDEX TO FORM 10-Q FILING
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
PAGE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Unless the context dictates otherwise, references in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the “Company,” “we,” “us,” “our,” and similar words are references to Apollo Medical Holdings, Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its consolidated subsidiaries and affiliated entities, as appropriate, including its consolidated variable interest entities (“VIEs”).
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) have not reviewed any statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q describing the participation of APA ACO, Inc. (“APAACO”) in the next generation accountable care organization (“NGACO”) model.
Trade names and trademarks of the Company and its subsidiaries referred to herein and their respective logos, are our property. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q may contain additional trade names and/or trademarks of other companies, which are the property of their respective owners. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names and/or trademarks, if any, to imply an endorsement or sponsorship of us by such companies, or any relationship with any of these companies.

3

Table of Contents


PART I FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(UNAUDITED)
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
 
 
 
 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
230,298,252

 
$
106,891,503

Restricted cash
20,150

 

Investment in marketable securities
1,154,480

 
1,127,102

Receivables, net
19,731,189

 
7,127,217

Receivables, net – related parties
37,708,178

 
49,328,739

Other receivables
15,527,520

 
1,003,133

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
10,495,938

 
7,385,098

Loans receivable - related parties
6,425,000

 

 
 
 
 
Total current assets
321,360,707

 
172,862,792

 
 
 
 
Noncurrent assets
 
 
 
Land, property and equipment, net
12,427,107

 
12,721,082

Intangible assets, net
114,166,305

 
86,875,883

Goodwill
237,134,772

 
185,805,880

Loans receivable – related parties, net of current portion
12,500,000

 
17,500,000

Investment in other entities – equity method
35,840,105

 
34,876,980

Investment in a privately held entity that does not report net asset value per share
896,000

 
405,000

Restricted cash
746,104

 
745,470

Right-of-use assets
13,540,129

 

Other assets
1,633,153

 
1,205,962

 
 
 
 
Total noncurrent assets
428,883,675

 
340,136,257

 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
750,244,382

 
$
512,999,049

Liabilities, Mezzanine Equity and Stockholders’ Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
$
35,539,917

 
$
25,075,489

Fiduciary accounts payable
1,734,142

 
1,538,598

Medical liabilities
53,819,647

 
33,641,701

Income taxes payable
1,392,492

 
11,621,861

Bank loan

 
40,257

Dividend payable
271,279

 

Finance lease liabilities
101,741

 
101,741


4

Table of Contents
APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (Continued)
(UNAUDITED)

 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
 
 
 
 
Operating lease liabilities
2,836,010

 

Current portion of long term debt
9,500,000

 
 
Total current liabilities
105,195,228

 
72,019,647

 
 
 
 
Noncurrent liabilities
 
 
 
Lines of credit – related party

 
13,000,000

Deferred tax liability
30,199,423

 
19,615,935

Liability for unissued equity shares
1,185,025

 
1,185,025

Finance lease liabilities
441,241

 
517,261

Operating lease liabilities
10,670,364

 

Long-term debt, net of current portion and deferred financing costs
234,149,063

 

 
 
 
 
Total noncurrent liabilities
276,645,116

 
34,318,221

 
 
 
 
Total liabilities
381,840,344

 
106,337,868

 
 
 
 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 11)


 


 
 
 
 
Mezzanine equity
 
 
 
Noncontrolling interest in Allied Physicians of California, a Professional Medical Corporation (“APC”)
176,230,074

 
225,117,029

 
 
 
 
Stockholders’ equity
 
 
 
Series A Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized (inclusive of all preferred stock, including Series B Preferred stock); 1,111,111 issued and zero outstanding at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively

 

Series B Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized (inclusive of all preferred stock, including Series A Preferred stock); 555,555 issued and zero outstanding at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized, 34,822,933 and 34,578,040 shares outstanding, excluding 16,959,069 and 1,850,603 treasury shares, at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively
34,823

 
34,578

Additional paid-in capital
165,521,888

 
162,723,051

Retained earnings
25,177,257

 
17,788,203

 
190,733,968

 
180,545,832

 
 
 
 
Noncontrolling interest
1,439,996

 
998,320

 
 
 
 
Total stockholders’ equity
192,173,964

 
181,544,152

 
 
 
 
Total liabilities, mezzanine equity and stockholders’ equity
$
750,244,382

 
$
512,999,049

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

5

Table of Contents

APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(UNAUDITED)
 
Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2019
 
2018
Revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capitation, net
$
130,807,706

 
$
90,612,720

 
$
305,548,176

 
$
266,834,186

Risk pool settlements and incentives
11,355,069

 
57,788,932

 
32,639,960

 
89,641,885

Management fee income
8,517,586

 
12,851,178

 
27,866,805

 
37,297,358

Fee-for-service, net
4,099,660

 
4,723,809

 
12,058,762

 
15,524,149

Other income
1,280,203

 
752,642

 
3,753,258

 
4,021,480

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total revenue
156,060,224

 
166,729,281

 
381,866,961

 
413,319,058

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of services
131,129,813

 
96,268,804

 
315,925,388

 
280,589,061

General and administrative expenses
7,949,814

 
9,040,336

 
30,031,329

 
31,481,810

Depreciation and amortization
4,920,429

 
4,843,037

 
13,792,581

 
14,819,627

Provision for doubtful accounts

 

 
(1,363,415
)
 

Impairment of intangibles
1,994,000

 

 
1,994,000

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total expenses
145,994,056

 
110,152,177

 
360,379,883

 
326,890,498

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from operations
10,066,168

 
56,577,104

 
21,487,078

 
86,428,560

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other income (expense)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) from equity method investments
2,053,730

 
(4,215,056
)
 
1,161,791

 
(2,573,219
)
Interest expense
(827,905
)
 
(178,318
)
 
(1,349,933
)
 
(374,002
)
Interest income
508,856

 
418,449

 
1,305,528

 
1,180,990

Other income
2,620,485

 
609,203

 
2,831,830

 
884,948

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total other income (expense), net
4,355,166

 
(3,365,722
)
 
3,949,216

 
(881,283
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income before provision for income taxes
14,421,334

 
53,211,382

 
25,436,294

 
85,547,277

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Provision for income taxes
3,682,472

 
14,585,942

 
6,483,630

 
23,338,589

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Net income
10,738,862

 
38,625,440

 
18,952,664

 
62,208,688

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
7,034,688

 
29,519,043

 
11,563,610

 
48,277,734

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to Apollo Medical Holdings, Inc.
$
3,704,174

 
$
9,106,397

 
$
7,389,054

 
$
13,930,954

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings per share – basic
$
0.11

 
$
0.28

 
$
0.21

 
$
0.43

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings per share – diluted
$
0.10

 
$
0.24

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.37

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average shares of common stock outstanding – basic
34,643,754

 
32,917,007

 
34,555,124

 
32,672,793

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average shares of common stock outstanding – diluted
37,792,266

 
38,387,700

 
37,816,698

 
38,010,838

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

6

Table of Contents

APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF MEZZANINE AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(UNAUDITED)
 
Mezzanine
Equity –
Noncontrolling
Interest in APC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Noncontrolling Interest
 
Common Stock Outstanding
 
Additional
Paid-in Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Shareholders'
Equity
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 
 
 
Balance January 1, 2019
$
225,117,029

 
34,578,040

 
$
34,578

 
$
162,723,051

 
$
17,788,203

 
$
998,320

 
$
181,544,152

Net income
(3,000,021
)
 

 

 

 
139,664

 
410,228

 
549,892

Purchase of treasury shares
(40,000
)
 
(93,451
)
 
(93
)
 
93

 

 

 

Shares issued for exercise of options and warrants
155,000

 
17,516

 
17

 
139,957

 

 

 
139,974

Share-based compensation
202,382

 
1,599

 
2

 
142,750

 

 

 
142,752

Dividends
(10,000,000
)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2019
212,434,390

 
34,503,704

 
34,504

 
163,005,851

 
17,927,867

 
1,408,548

 
182,376,770

Net income
6,895,740

 

 

 

 
3,545,216

 
222,975

 
3,768,191

Shares issued for exercise of options and warrants
50,000

 
135,108

 
135

 
757,993

 

 

 
758,128

Share-based compensation
202,382

 

 

 
127,999

 

 

 
127,999

Dividends

 

 

 

 

 
(941,588
)
 
(941,588
)
Balance at June 30, 2019
$
219,582,512

 
34,638,812

 
$
34,639

 
$
163,891,843

 
$
21,473,083

 
$
689,935

 
$
186,089,500

Net income
6,284,627

 

 

 

 
3,704,174

 
750,061

 
4,454,235

Shares issued for exercise of options and warrants

 
184,121

 
184

 
1,502,044

 

 

 
1,502,228

Share-based compensation
202,382

 

 

 
128,001

 

 

 
128,001

Stock subscription
549,998

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock issued in connection with acquisition of a business
414,250

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costs related to issuance of preferred shares
(803,695
)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends
(50,000,000
)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at September 30, 2019
$
176,230,074

 
34,822,933

 
$
34,823

 
$
165,521,888

 
$
25,177,257

 
$
1,439,996

 
$
192,173,964


7

Table of Contents

 
Mezzanine
Equity –
Noncontrolling
Interest in APC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Noncontrolling Interest
 
Common Stock Outstanding
 
Additional
Paid-in Capital
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Shareholders'
Equity
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
 
 
 
Balance January 1, 2018
$
172,129,744

 
32,304,876

 
$
32,305

 
$
158,181,192

 
$
1,734,531

 
$
4,235,398

 
$
164,183,426

ASC 606 Adoption
7,351,434

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1,002,468

 
 
 
1,002,468

Net income
12,970,752

 

 
$

 
$

 
2,160,455

 
586,448

 
2,746,903

Shares issued for exercise of options and warrants

 
309,826

 
310

 
1,923,474

 

 

 
1,923,784

Share-based compensation
202,382

 
37,593

 
38

 
631,524

 

 

 
631,562

Dividends
(2,000,000
)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2018
190,654,312

 
32,652,295

 
32,653

 
160,736,190

 
4,897,454

 
4,821,846

 
170,488,143

Net income
4,857,625

 

 

 

 
2,664,102

 
343,866

 
3,007,968

Purchase price adjustment from merger

 

 

 
868,000

 

 

 
868,000

Shares issued for exercise of options and warrants
200,000

 
188,875

 
188

 
423,357

 

 

 
423,545

Share-based compensation
202,382

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noncontrolling interest capital charge

 

 

 

 

 
27,500

 
27,500

Balance at June 30, 2018
195,914,319

 
32,841,170

 
32,841

 
162,027,547

 
7,561,556

 
5,193,212

 
174,815,156

Net income
29,030,555

 

 

 

 
9,106,397

 
488,488

 
9,594,885

Shares issued for exercise of options and warrants

 
184,019

 
184

 
1,226,532

 

 

 
1,226,716

Share-based compensation
202,383

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of additional shares in consolidated equity

 

 

 
(443,384
)
 
 
 
443,184

 
(200
)
Purchase of treasury shares

 

 

 

 
432,112

 

 
432,112

Dividends

 

 

 

 

 
(942,000
)
 
(942,000
)
Balance at September 30, 2018
$
225,147,257

 
33,025,189

 
$
33,025

 
$
162,810,695

 
$
17,100,065

 
$
5,182,884

 
$
185,126,669

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

8

Table of Contents

APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(UNAUDITED)
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
Cash flows from operating activities
 
 
 
Net income
$
18,952,664

 
$
62,208,688

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
13,792,581

 
14,819,627

Impairment of intangible
1,994,000

 

Loss on disposal of property and equipment

 
41,782

Provision for doubtful accounts
(1,363,415
)
 

Share-based compensation
1,005,898

 
1,238,708

Gain on loan assumption
(2,250,000
)
 

Unrealized (gain) loss from investment in equity securities
(6,283
)
 
10,218

(Income) loss from equity method investments
(1,161,791
)
 
2,573,219

Deferred tax
(185,699
)
 
7,135,408

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of business combinations:
 
 
 
Receivable, net
1,905,076

 
4,484,115

Receivable, net – related parties
5,864,052

 
(43,360,966
)
Other receivables
(13,719,229
)
 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
(2,913,570
)
 
(80,618
)
Right-of-use assets
1,877,353

 

Other assets
(524,689
)
 
(26,931
)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
4,868,437

 
31,701,367

Dividends payable

 

Incentives payable

 
(16,500,000
)
Fiduciary accounts payable
195,544

 

Medical liabilities
(6,226,426
)
 
(30,466,895
)
Income taxes payable
(10,229,369
)
 
(1,912,842
)
Operating lease liabilities
(1,790,313
)
 

Net cash provided by operating activities
10,084,821

 
31,864,880

 
 
 
 
Cash flows from investing activities
 
 
 
Payments for business acquisitions, net of cash acquired
(49,402,514
)
 

Advances on loans receivable
(7,425,000
)
 
(2,500,000
)
Purchases of marketable securities
(21,095
)
 
(9,013
)
Purchases of investment - equity method
(2,949,000
)
 
(16,673,840
)
Purchases of a privately held entity that does not report net asset value per share

 
(405,000
)
Purchases of property and equipment
(806,590
)
 
(867,732
)
Dividend received
240,000

 
207,410

Net cash used in investing activities
(60,364,199
)
 
(20,248,175
)
 
 
 
 
Cash flows from financing activities
 
 
 
Repayment of bank loan and lines of credit
(52,640,257
)
 
(375,485
)
Dividends paid
(60,670,309
)
 
(16,725,799
)

9

Table of Contents

Change in noncontrolling interest capital

 
27,300

Payment of capital lease obligations
(76,020
)
 
(73,775
)
Proceeds from the exercise of stock options and warrants
2,400,330

 
3,574,046

Repurchase of shares
(40,000
)
 

Borrowings on line of credit and long-term debt
289,600,000

 
8,000,000

Proceeds from common stock offering
754,998

 
200,000

Cost of debt and equity issuance costs
(5,621,831
)
 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
173,706,911

 
(5,373,713
)
 
 
 
 
Net increase in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
123,427,533

 
6,242,992

 
 
 
 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, beginning of period
107,636,973

 
118,500,095

 
 
 
 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period
$
231,064,506

 
$
124,743,087

 
 
 
 
Supplementary disclosures of cash flow information:
 
 
 
Cash paid for income taxes
$
17,900,000

 
$
18,032,590

Cash paid for interest
999,582

 
287,332

 
 
 
 
Supplemental disclosures of non-cash investing and financing activities
 
 
 
Cashless exercise of stock options
$

 
$
47

Deferred tax liability adjustment to goodwill
$
11,539,600

 
$
1,110,456

Dividend declared included in dividend payable
$
271,279

 
$

APC stock issued in exchange for AMG
$
414,250

 
$

Refer to Note 16 for supplemental cash flow information related to the adoption of ASC 842. 

10

Table of Contents

APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(UNAUDITED)
The following table provides a reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash reported within the condensed consolidated balance sheets that sum to the total amounts of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash shown in the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows.
 
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
Cash and cash equivalents
$
230,298,252

 
$
119,779,499

Restricted cash – short-term - distributions to former NMM shareholders
20,150

 
4,218,176

Restricted cash – letters of credit
746,104

 
745,412

Total cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash shown in the statement of cash flows
$
231,064,506

 
$
124,743,087

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

11

Table of Contents

APOLLO MEDICAL HOLDINGS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(UNAUDITED)
1.
Description of Business
Overview
Apollo Medical Holdings, Inc. (“ApolloMed”), entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger dated as of December 21, 2016 (as amended on March 30, 2017 and October 17, 2017) (the “Merger Agreement”) among ApolloMed, Apollo Acquisition Corp., a California corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of ApolloMed, Network Medical Management, Inc. (“NMM”), and Kenneth Sim, M.D. in his capacity as the representative of the shareholders of NMM, pursuant to which ApolloMed effected a merger with NMM (the “Merger”). The Merger closed and became effective on December 8, 2017 (the “Closing”). As a result of the Merger, NMM is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of ApolloMed and the former NMM shareholders own a majority of the issued and outstanding common stock of ApolloMed. For accounting purposes, the Merger is treated as a “reverse acquisition,” and NMM is considered the accounting acquirer and ApolloMed is the accounting acquiree. Accordingly, as of the Closing, NMM’s historical results of operations replaced ApolloMed’s historical results of operations for all periods prior to the Merger, and the results of operations of both companies are included in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements for all periods following the Merger.
The combined company, following the Merger, together with its affiliated physician groups and consolidated entities (collectively, the “Company”), is a physician-centric integrated population health management company providing coordinated, outcomes-based medical care in a cost-effective manner and serving patients in California, the majority of whom are covered by private or public insurance provided through Medicare, Medicaid and health maintenance organizations (“HMOs”). A small portion of the Company’s revenue is generated from non-insured patients. The Company provides care coordination services to each major constituent of the healthcare delivery system, including patients, families, primary care physicians, specialists, acute care hospitals, alternative sites of inpatient care, physician groups and health plans. The Company’s physician network consists of primary care physicians, specialist physicians and hospitalists. The Company operates primarily through the following subsidiaries of ApolloMed: NMM, Apollo Medical Management, Inc. (“AMM”), APA ACO, Inc. ("APAACO") and Apollo Care Connect, Inc. (“Apollo Care Connect”), and their consolidated entities.
NMM was formed in 1994 as a management service organization (“MSO”) for the purposes of providing management services to medical companies and independent practice associations (“IPAs”). The management services include primarily billing, collection, accounting, administrative, quality assurance, marketing, compliance and education.
Allied Physicians of California IPA, a Professional Medical Corporation d.b.a. Allied Pacific of California IPA (“APC”) was incorporated on August 17, 1992 for the purpose of arranging health care services as an IPA. APC has contracts with various HMOs and other licensed health care service plans as defined in the California Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975. Each HMO negotiates a fixed amount per member per month (“PMPM”) that is to be paid to APC. In return, APC arranges for the delivery of health care services by contracting with physicians or professional medical corporations for primary care and specialty care services. APC assumes the financial risk of the cost of delivering health care services in excess of the fixed amounts received. Some of the risk is transferred to the contracted physicians or professional corporations. The risk is also minimized by stop-loss provisions in contracts with HMOs.
On July 1, 1999, APC entered into an amended and restated management and administrative services agreement with NMM (the initial management services agreement was entered into in 1997) for an initial fixed term of 30 years. In accordance with relevant accounting guidance, APC is determined to be a variable interest entity (“VIE”) of the Company as NMM is the primary beneficiary with the ability to direct the activities (excluding clinical decisions) that most significantly affect APC’s economic performance through its majority representation on the APC Joint Planning Board; therefore APC is consolidated by NMM.
On September 11, 2019, ApolloMed completed a series of agreements with two of its affiliates, AP-AMH and APC as follows;
1.
The Company loaned AP-AMH $545.0 million pursuant to a ten-year secured loan agreement. The loan bears interest at a rate of 10% per annum simple interest, is not prepayable (except in certain limited circumstances), requires quarterly payments of interest only in arrears, and is secured by a first priority security interest in all of AP-AMH's assets, including the shares of APC Series A Preferred Stock to be purchased by AP-AMH. To the extent that AP-AMH is unable to make any interest payment when due because it has received dividends on the APC Series A Preferred Stock insufficient to pay in full such interest payment, then the outstanding principal amount of the loan will be increased by the amount of any such accrued but unpaid interest, and any such increased principal amounts will bear interest at the rate of 10.75% per annum simple interest.

12

Table of Contents

2.
AP-AMH purchased 1,000,000 shares of APC Series A Preferred Stock for aggregate consideration of $545.0 million in a private placement. Under the terms of the APC Certificate of Determination of Preferences of Series A Preferred Stock (the "Certificate of Determination"), AP-AMH is entitled to receive preferential, cumulative dividends that accrue on a daily basis and that are equal to the sum of (i) APC's net income from Healthcare Services (as defined in the Certificate of Determination), plus (ii) any dividends received by APC from certain of APC's affiliated entities, less (iii) any Retained Amounts (as defined in the Certificate of Determination).
3.
APC purchased 15,015,015 shares of the Company's common stock for total consideration of $300.0 million in private placement. In connection therewith, the Company granted APC certain registration rights with respect to the Company's common stock that APC purchased, and APC agreed that APC votes in excess of 9.99% of the Company's then outstanding shares will be voted by proxy given to the Company's management, and that those proxy holders will cast the excess votes in the same proportion as all other votes cast on any specific proposal coming before the Company's stockholders.
4.
The Company licensed to AP-AMH the right to use certain tradenames for certain specified purposes for a fee equal to a percentage of the aggregate gross revenues of AP-AMH. The license fee is payable out of any Series A Preferred Stock dividends received by AP-AMH from APC.
5.
Through its subsidiary, NMM, the Company agreed to provide certain administrative services to AP-AMH for a fee equal to a percentage of the aggregate gross revenues of AP-AMH. The administrative fee also is payable out of any APC Series A Preferred Stock dividends received by AP-AMH from APC.
As of a result of the transaction, APC's ownership in ApolloMed increased to 32.54% at September 30, 2019 from 4.82% at December 31, 2018.
Concourse Diagnostic Surgery Center, LLC (“CDSC”) was formed on March 25, 2010 in the state of California. CDSC is an ambulatory surgery center in City of Industry, California. Its facility is Medicare Certified and accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Healthcare, Inc. During 2011, APC invested $0.6 million for a 41.59% ownership interest in CDSC. APC’s ownership percentage in CDSC’s capital stock increased to 43.43% on July 31, 2016. CDSC is consolidated as a VIE by APC as it was determined that APC has a controlling financial interest in CDSC and is the primary beneficiary of CDSC.
APC-LSMA Designated Shareholder Medical Corporation ("APC-LSMA") was formed on October 15, 2012 as a designated shareholder professional corporation. Dr. Thomas Lam, a shareholder and the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of APC and Co-Chief Executive Officer of ApolloMed, is a nominee shareholder of APC. APC makes all investment decisions on behalf of APC-LSMA, funds all investments and receives all distributions from the investments. APC has the obligation to absorb losses and right to receive benefits from all investments made by APC-LSMA. APC-LSMA’s sole function is to act as the nominee shareholder for APC in other California medical professional corporations. Therefore, APC-LSMA is controlled and consolidated by APC as the primary beneficiary of this VIE. The only activity of APC-LSMA is to hold the investments in medical corporations, including the IPA lines of business of LaSalle Medical Associates (“LMA”), Pacific Medical Imaging and Oncology Center, Inc. (“PMIOC”), Diagnostic Medical Group (“DMG”) and AHMC International Cancer Center, a Medical Corporation (“ICC”). APC-LSMA also holds a 100% ownership interest in Maverick Medical Group, Inc. (“MMG”), Alpha Care Medical Group, Inc. (“Alpha Care”), Accountable Health Care IPA, a Professional Medical Corporation ("Accountable Health Care"), and AMG, a Professional Medical Corporation ("AMG").
Alpha Care, an IPA which the Company acquired on May 31, 2019, has been operating in California since 1993 is a risk bearing organization engaged in providing professional services under capitation arrangements with its contracted health plans through a provider network consisting of primary care and specialty care physicians. Alpha Care specializes in delivering high-quality healthcare to over 170,000 enrollees, as of September 30, 2019, and focuses on Medi-Cal/Medicaid, Commercial, and Medicare and Dual Eligible members in the Riverside and San Bernardino counties of Southern California.
Accountable Health Care is a California based IPA that has served the local community in the greater Los Angeles County area through a network of physicians and health care providers for more than 20 years. Accountable Health Care currently has a network of over 400 primary care physicians and 700 specialty care physicians, and five community and regional hospital medical centers that provide quality health care services to more than 89,000 members of three federally qualified health plans and multiple product lines, including Medi-Cal, Commercial, Medicare and the California Healthy Families program. On August 30, 2019, APC and APC-LSMA, acquired the remaining outstanding shares of capital stock (comprising 75%) and as such as of September 30, 2019, Accountable Health Care is 100% owned (see Note 3 and Note 5).
AMG is a network of family practice clinics operating out of three main locations in Southern California. AMG provides professional and post-acute care services to Medicare, Medi-Cal/Medicaid, and Commercial patients through its networks of doctors and nurse practitioners. On September 10, 2019, APC-LSMA, a holding company of APC, agreed to purchase and acquire 100% of the

13

Table of Contents

aggregate issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of AMG for $1.2 million in cash and $0.4 million of APC common stock (see Note 3).
ICC was formed on September 2, 2010 in the state of California. ICC is a professional medical corporation that has entered into agreements with HMOs, IPAs, medical groups and other purchasers of medical services for the arrangement of services to subscribers or enrollees. On November 15, 2016, APC-LSMA, a holding company of APC, agreed to purchase and acquire from ICC 40% of the aggregate issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of ICC for $0.4 million in cash. Certain requirements to complete the investment transaction were completed in August 2017 and effective on October 31, 2017, ICC was consolidated by APC as a VIE as it was determined that APC is the primary beneficiary of ICC through its obligation to absorb losses and right to receive benefits that could potentially be significant to ICC.
Universal Care Acquisition Partners, LLC (“UCAP”), a 100% owned subsidiary of APC, was formed on June 4, 2014, for the purpose of holding an investment in Universal Care, Inc. (“UCI”).
APAACO, jointly owned by NMM and AMM, began participating in the next generation accountable care organization model (“NGACO Model”) of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services ("CMS") in January 2017. The NGACO Model is a new CMS program that allows provider groups to assume higher levels of financial risk and potentially achieve a higher reward from participating in this new attribution-based risk sharing model. In addition to APAACO, NMM and AMM operated three accountable care organizations (“ACOs”) that participated in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (“MSSP”), with the goal of improving the quality of patient care and outcomes through a more efficient and coordinated approach among providers. MSSP revenues are uncertain, and, if such amounts are payable by CMS, they will be paid on an annual basis significantly after the time earned, and are contingent on various factors, including achievement of the minimum savings rate for the relevant period. Such payments are earned and made on an “all or nothing” basis.
AMM, a wholly-owned subsidiary of ApolloMed, manages affiliated medical groups, which consist of ApolloMed Hospitalists, a Medical Corporation (“AMH”), a hospitalist company, Southern California Heart Centers, a Medical Corporation (“SCHC”), Bay Area Hospitalist Associates, Inc. (“BAHA”), a Medical Corporation, ApolloMed Care Clinic, a Professional Corporation (“ACC”) and AKM Medical Group, Inc. (“AKM”). AMH provides hospitalist, intensivist and physician advisor services. SCHC is a specialty clinic that focuses on cardiac care and diagnostic testing. BAHA, ACC and AKM are no longer active to any material extent.
Apollo Care Connect, a wholly-owned subsidiary of ApolloMed, provides a cloud and mobile-based population health management platform that includes digital care plans, a case management module, connectivity with multiple healthcare tracking devices and the ability to integrate with multiple electronic health records to capture clinical data.
AP-AMH Medical Corporation (“AP-AMH”) was formed on May 7, 2019 as a designated shareholder professional corporation. Dr. Thomas Lam, a shareholder, and the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of APC and Co-Chief Executive Officer of ApolloMed, is the sole shareholder of AP-AMH. ApolloMed makes all the decisions on behalf of AP-AMH and funds and receives all the distributions from its operations. ApolloMed has the rights to receive benefits from the operations of AP-AMH and has the option, but not the obligation, to cover losses. Therefore, AP-AMH is controlled and consolidated by ApolloMed as the primary beneficiary of this VIE.
2.
Basis of Presentation
Basis of Presentation
The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2018, has been derived from audited consolidated financial statements, but does not include all disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”). The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements as of September 30, 2019 and for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes to the financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018 as filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on March 18, 2019. In the opinion of management, all material adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been made to the condensed consolidated financial statements. The condensed consolidated financial statements include all material adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) necessary to make the condensed consolidated financial statements not misleading as required by Regulation S-X, Rule 10-01. Operating results for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2019 or any future periods.

14

Table of Contents

Principles of Consolidation
The condensed consolidated balance sheets as of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, and the condensed consolidated statements of income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, include the accounts of ApolloMed, its consolidated subsidiaries NMM, AMM, APAACO, Apollo Care Connect; ApolloMed's consolidated VIE, AP-AMH; NMM’s consolidated VIE, APC; APC’s subsidiary, UCAP; and APC’s consolidated VIEs, CDSC, APC-LSMA, ICC, and Alpha Care. Effective on September 1, 2019, the condensed consolidated balance sheets as of September 30, 2019 and the condensed consolidated statements of income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019, also include the accounts of Accountable Health Care.
All material intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.
Use of Estimates
The preparation of the condensed consolidated financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant items subject to such estimates and assumptions include collectability of receivables, recoverability of long-lived and intangible assets, business combination and goodwill valuation and impairment, accrual of medical liabilities (incurred, but not reported (“IBNR”) claims), determination of full-risk and shared-risk revenue and receivables (including constraints and completion factors including historical medical loss ratios (“MLR”)), income taxes, valuation of share-based compensation and right-of-use ("ROU") assets and lease liabilities. Management evaluates its estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis using historical experience and other factors, including the current economic environment, and makes adjustments when facts and circumstances dictate. As future events and their effects cannot be determined with precision, actual results could differ materially from those estimates and assumptions.
Reportable Segments
The Company operates as one reportable segment, the healthcare delivery segment, and implements and operates innovative health care models to create a patient-centered, physician-centric experience. The Company reports its condensed consolidated financial statements in the aggregate, including all activities in one reportable segment.
Reclassifications
Certain amounts disclosed in prior period financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation. These reclassifications had no material effect on the Company’s reported revenue, net income, cash flows or total assets.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
The Company’s cash and cash equivalents primarily consist of money market funds and certificates of deposit. The Company considers all highly liquid investments that are both readily convertible into known amounts of cash and mature within ninety days from their date of purchase to be cash equivalents.
The Company maintains its cash in deposit accounts with several banks, which at times may exceed the insured limits of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). The Company believes it is not exposed to any significant credit risk with respect to its cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash. As of September 30, 2019, the Company’s deposit accounts with banks exceeded the FDIC’s insured limit by approximately $248.7 million. The Company has not experienced any losses to date and performs ongoing evaluations of these financial institutions to limit the Company’s concentration of risk exposure.
Investments in Marketable Securities
The appropriate classification of investments is determined at the time of purchase and such designation is reevaluated at each balance sheet date. Investments in marketable debt securities have been classified and accounted for as held-to-maturity based on management’s investment intentions relating to these securities. Held-to-maturity marketable securities are stated at amortized cost, which approximates fair value. As of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, short-term marketable securities in the amount of approximately $1.2 million, consist of certificates of deposit with various financial institutions, reported at par value plus accrued interest, with maturity dates from four months to twelve months (see fair value measurements of financial instruments below). Investments in certificates of deposits are classified as Level 1 investments in the fair value hierarchy.
Receivables and Receivables – Related Parties

15

Table of Contents

The Company’s receivables are comprised of accounts receivable, capitation and claims receivable, risk pool settlements and incentive receivables, management fee income and other receivables. Accounts receivable are recorded and stated at the amount expected to be collected.
The Company’s receivables – related parties are comprised of risk pool settlements, management fee income and incentive receivables, and other receivables. Receivables – related parties are recorded and stated at the amount expected to be collected.
Capitation and claims receivable relate to each health plan’s capitation, is received by the Company in the month following the month of service. Risk pool settlements and incentive receivables mainly consist of the Company’s full risk pool receivable that is recorded quarterly based on reports received from our hospital partners and management’s estimate of the Company’s portion of the estimated risk pool surplus for open performance years. Settlement of risk pool surplus or deficits occurs approximately 18 months after the risk pool performance year is completed. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, recoverable claims paid related to the 2019 APAACO performance year to be administered following instructions from CMS, fee-for-services (“FFS”) reimbursement for patient care, certain expense reimbursements, transportation reimbursements from the hospitals, and stop loss insurance premium reimbursements are included in “Other receivables” in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet.
The Company maintains reserves for potential credit losses on accounts receivable. Management reviews the composition of accounts receivable and analyzes historical bad debts, customer concentrations, customer credit worthiness, current economic trends and changes in customer payment patterns to evaluate the adequacy of these reserves. The Company also regularly analyzes the ultimate collectability of accounts receivable after certain stages of the collection cycle using a look-back analysis to determine the amount of receivables subsequently collected and adjustments are recorded when necessary. Reserves are recorded primarily on a specific identification basis.
Receivables are recorded when the Company is able to determine amounts receivable under these contracts and/or agreements based on information provided and collection is reasonably likely to occur. The Company continuously monitors its collections of receivables and its policy is to write off receivables when they are determined to be uncollectible. As of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, the Company’s allowance for doubtful accounts was approximately $2.9 million and approximately $4.3 million, respectively.
Concentrations of Risks
The Company disaggregates revenue from contracts by service type and payor type. This level of detail provides useful information pertaining to how the Company generates revenue by significant revenue stream and by type of direct contracts. The consolidated statements of income present disaggregated revenue by service type. The following table presents disaggregated revenue generated by each payor type for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018:
Three Months Ended September 30,
2019
 
2018
 
 
 
 
Commercial
$
25,429,304

 
$
28,463,636

Medicare
60,737,135

 
79,117,660

Medicaid
61,189,161

 
47,318,190

Other third parties
8,704,624

 
11,829,795

Revenue
$
156,060,224

 
$
166,729,281


Nine Months Ended September 30,
2019
 
2018
 
 
 
 
Commercial
$
75,883,004

 
$
83,830,517

Medicare
155,729,758

 
186,449,517

Medicaid
122,836,562

 
109,870,854

Other third parties
27,417,637

 
33,168,170

Revenue
$
381,866,961

 
$
413,319,058

The Company had major payors that contributed the following percentages of net revenue:

16

Table of Contents

 
For the Three Months Ended
September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
 
 
 
 
Payor A
12.0
%
 
14.8
%
Payor B
11.7
%
 
18.4
%
Payor C
*

 
12.7
%
Payor D
12.0
%
 
16.7
%
Payor E
19.9
%
 
*


 
For the Nine Months Ended September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
 
 
 
 
Payor A
14.3
%
 
13.4
%
Payor B
13.3
%
 
16.9
%
Payor C
10.0
%
 
13.1
%
Payor D
*

 
15.6
%
Payor E
11.0
%
 
*


*
Less than 10% of total net revenues
The Company had major payors that contributed to the following percentages of receivables and receivables – related parties before the allowance for doubtful accounts:
 
As of
September 30,
2019
 
As of
December 31,
2018
 
 
 
 
Payor E
18.1
%
 
*

Payor F
28.0
%
 
34.1
%
Payor G
29.1
%
 
42.2
%
*
Less than 10% of total receivables and receivables - related parties, net
Fair Value Measurements of Financial Instruments
The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents, fiduciary cash, restricted cash, investment in marketable securities, receivables, loans receivable, accounts payable, certain accrued expenses, capital lease obligations, and long-term debt. The carrying values of the financial instruments classified as current in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets are considered to be at their fair values, due to the short maturity of these instruments. The carrying amounts of the loan receivables – long term, capital lease obligations and long term debt approximate fair value as they bear interest at rates that approximate current market rates for debt with similar maturities and credit quality.
Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement (“ASC 820”), applies to all financial assets and financial liabilities that are measured and reported on a fair value basis and requires disclosure that establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure about fair value measurements. ASC 820 establishes a fair value hierarchy for disclosures of the inputs to valuations used to measure fair value.
This hierarchy prioritizes the inputs into three broad levels as follows:
Level 1 —Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that can be accessed at the measurement date.

17

Table of Contents

Level 2 —Inputs include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability (i.e., interest rates and yield curves), and inputs that are derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data by correlation or other means (market corroborated inputs).
Level 3 —Unobservable inputs that reflect assumptions about what market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. These inputs would be based on the best information available, including the Company’s own data.
The carrying amounts and fair values of the Company’s financial instruments as of September 30, 2019 are presented below:
 
Fair Value Measurements
 
 
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds*
$
194,428,575

 
$

 
$

 
$
194,428,575

Marketable securities – certificates of deposit
1,087,197

 

 

 
1,087,197

Marketable securities – equity securities
67,283

 

 

 
67,283

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
$
195,583,055

 
$

 
$

 
$
195,583,055

The carrying amounts and fair values of the Company’s financial instruments as of December 31, 2018 are presented below:
 
Fair Value Measurements
 
 
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
 
Level 3
 
Total
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds*
$
85,500,745

 
$

 
$

 
$
85,500,745

Marketable securities – certificates of deposit
1,066,103

 

 

 
1,066,103

Marketable securities – equity securities
60,999

 

 

 
60,999

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
$
86,627,847

 
$

 
$

 
$
86,627,847

*    Included in cash and cash equivalents
There were no Level 2 or Level 3 inputs measured on a recurring basis for the nine months ended September 30, 2019.
There have been no changes in Level 1, Level 2, or Level 3 classification and no changes in valuation techniques for these assets for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019.
Intangible Assets and Long-Lived Assets
Intangible assets with finite lives include network-payor relationships, management contracts and member relationships and are stated at cost, less accumulated amortization and impairment losses. These intangible assets are amortized on the accelerated method using the discounted cash flow rate.
Intangible assets with finite lives also include a patient management platform, as well as trade names and trademarks, whose valuations were determined using the cost to recreate method and the relief from royalty method, respectively. These assets are stated at cost, less accumulated amortization and impairment losses, and are amortized using the straight-line method.
Finite-lived intangibles and long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. If the expected future cash flows from the use of such assets (undiscounted and without interest charges) are less than the carrying value, a write-down would be recorded to reduce the carrying value of the asset to its estimated fair value. Fair value is determined based on appropriate valuation techniques. The Company determined that there was no impairment of its finite-lived intangible or long-lived assets during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018.
Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets

18

Table of Contents

Under ASC 350, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (“ASC 350”), goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are reviewed at least annually for impairment.
At least annually, at the Company’s fiscal year end, or sooner if events or changes in circumstances indicate that an impairment has occurred, the Company performs a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of each reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to complete quantitative impairment assessments for each of the Company’s three main reporting units (1) management services, (2) IPAs, and (3) ACOs. The Company is required to perform a quantitative goodwill impairment test only if the conclusion from the qualitative assessment is that it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than the carrying value of its assets. Should this be the case, a quantitative analysis is performed to identify whether a potential impairment exists by comparing the estimated fair values of the reporting units with their respective carrying values, including goodwill.
An impairment loss is recognized if the implied fair value of the asset being tested is less than its carrying value. In this event, the asset is written down accordingly. The fair values of goodwill are determined using valuation techniques based on estimates, judgments and assumptions management believes are appropriate in the circumstances.
At least annually, indefinite-lived intangible assets are tested for impairment. Impairment for intangible assets with indefinite lives exists if the carrying value of the intangible asset exceeds its fair value. The fair values of indefinite-lived intangible assets are determined using valuation techniques based on estimates, judgments and assumptions management believes are appropriate in the circumstances.
The Company had no impairment of its goodwill or definite-lived intangible assets during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018. However, during the three months ended September 30, 2019, the Company wrote off indefinite-lived intangible assets of $2.0 million related to Medicare licenses it acquired as part of the Merger. The Company will no longer utilize the licenses and as such will not receive future economic benefits.
Investments in Other Entities - Equity Method
The Company accounts for certain investments using the equity method of accounting when it is determined that the investment provides the Company with the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control, over the investee. Significant influence is generally deemed to exist if the Company has an ownership interest in the voting stock of the investee of between 20% and 50%, although other factors, such as representation on the investee’s board of directors, are considered in determining whether the equity method of accounting is appropriate. Under the equity method of accounting, the investment, originally recorded at cost, is adjusted to recognize the Company’s share of net earnings or losses of the investee and is recognized in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income under “Income (loss) from equity method investments” and also is adjusted by contributions to and distributions from the investee. Equity method investments are subject to impairment evaluation. On March 31, 2019, the Company recognized an impairment loss of $0.3 million related to its investment in Pacific Ambulatory Surgery Center, LLC (“PASC”) (included in loss from equity method investments in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income) as the Company does not expect to recover its investment (see Note 5).
Medical Liabilities
APC, including Alpha Care and Accountable Health Care, APAACO and MMG are responsible for integrated care that the associated physicians and contracted hospitals provide to its enrollees. APC, including Alpha Care and Accountable Health Care, APAACO and MMG provide integrated care to HMOs, Medicare and Medi-Cal enrollees through a network of contracted providers under sub-capitation and direct patient service arrangements. Medical costs for professional and institutional services rendered by contracted providers are recorded as cost of services expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income.
An estimate of amounts due to contracted physicians, hospitals, and other professional providers is included in medical liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Medical liabilities include claims reported as of the balance sheet date and estimates IBNR claims. Such estimates are developed using actuarial methods and are based on numerous variables, including the utilization of health care services, historical payment patterns, cost trends, product mix, seasonality, changes in membership, and other factors. The estimation methods and the resulting reserves are periodically reviewed and updated. Many of the medical contracts are complex in nature and may be subject to differing interpretations regarding amounts due for the provision of various services. Such differing interpretations may not come to light until a substantial period of time has passed following the contract implementation.

Revenue Recognition

19

Table of Contents

The Company adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2014-9, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)” on January 1, 2018 and recognizes revenue in accordance with the applicable guidance.
The Company receives payments from the following sources for services rendered: (i) commercial insurers; (ii) the federal government under the Medicare program administered by CMS; (iii) state governments under the Medicaid and other programs; (iv) other third party payors (e.g., hospitals and IPAs); and (v) individual patients and clients.
Nature of Services and Revenue Streams
Revenue primarily consists of capitation revenue, risk pool settlements and incentives, NGACO All-Inclusive Population-Based Payments (“AIPBP”), management fee income, and FFS revenue. Revenue is recorded in the period in which services are rendered or the period in which the Company is obligated to provide services. The form of billing and related risk of collection for such services may vary by type of revenue and the customer. The following is a summary of the principal forms of the Company’s billing arrangements and how revenue is recognized for each.
Capitation, net
Managed care revenues of the Company consist primarily of capitated fees for medical services provided by the Company under a capitated arrangement directly made with various managed care providers including HMOs. Capitation revenue is typically prepaid monthly to the Company based on the number of enrollees selecting the Company as their healthcare provider. Capitation revenue is recognized in the month in which the Company is obligated to provide services to plan enrollees under contracts with various health plans. Minor ongoing adjustments to prior months’ capitation, primarily arising from contracted HMOs finalizing their monthly patient eligibility data for additions or subtractions of enrollees, are recognized in the month they are communicated to the Company. Additionally, Medicare pays capitation using a “Risk Adjustment” model, which compensates managed care organizations and providers based on the health status (acuity) of each individual enrollee. Health plans and providers with higher acuity enrollees will receive more and those with lower acuity enrollees will receive less. Under Risk Adjustment, capitation is determined based on health severity, measured using patient encounter data. Capitation is paid on a monthly basis based on data submitted for the enrollee for the preceding year and is adjusted in subsequent periods after the final data is compiled. Positive or negative capitation adjustments are made for Medicare enrollees with conditions requiring more or less healthcare services than assumed in the interim payments. Since the Company cannot reliably predict these adjustments, periodic changes in capitation amounts earned as a result of Risk Adjustment are recognized when those changes are communicated by the health plans to the Company.
PMPM managed care contracts generally have a term of one year or longer. All managed care contracts have a single performance obligation that constitutes a series for the provision of managed healthcare services for a population of enrolled members for the duration of the contract. The transaction price for PMPM contracts is variable as it primarily includes PMPM fees associated with unspecified membership that fluctuates throughout the contract. In certain contracts, PMPM fees also include adjustments for items such as performance incentives, performance guarantees and risk shares. The Company generally estimates the transaction price using the most likely amount methodology and amounts are only included in the net transaction price to the extent that it is probable that a significant reversal of cumulative revenue will not occur once any uncertainty is resolved. The majority of the Company’s net PMPM transaction price relates specifically to the Company’s efforts to transfer the service for a distinct increment of the series (e.g. day or month) and is recognized as revenue in the month in which members are entitled to service.
Risk Pool Settlements and Incentives
APC and Accountable Health Care enter into full risk capitation arrangements with certain health plans and local hospitals, which are administered by a third party, where the hospital is responsible for providing, arranging and paying for institutional risk and APC and Accountable Health Care are responsible for providing, arranging and paying for professional risk. Under a full risk pool sharing agreement, APC and Accountable Health Care generally receive a percentage of the net surplus from the affiliated hospital’s risk pools with HMOs after deductions for the affiliated hospital’s costs. Advance settlement payments are typically made quarterly in arrears if there is a surplus. Risk pool settlements under arrangements with health plans and hospitals are recognized using the most likely amount methodology and amounts are only included in revenue to the extent that it is probable that a significant reversal of cumulative revenue will not occur once any uncertainty is resolved. The assumptions for historical MLR, IBNR completion factor and constraint percentages were used by management in applying the most likely amount method.
Under capitated arrangements with certain HMOs, APC participates in one or more shared risk arrangements relating to the provision of institutional services to enrollees (shared risk arrangements) and thus can earn additional revenue or incur losses based upon the enrollees' utilization of institutional services. Shared risk capitation arrangements are entered into with certain health plans, which are administered by the health plan, where APC is responsible for rendering professional services, but the health plan does not enter into a capitation arrangement with a hospital and therefore the health plan retains the institutional risk.

20

Table of Contents

Shared risk deficits, if any, are not payable until and unless (and only to the extent of any) risk sharing surpluses are generated. At the termination of the HMO contract, any accumulated deficit will be extinguished.
Risk pool settlements under arrangements with HMOs are recognized, using the most likely amount methodology, and only included in revenue to the extent that it is probable that a significant reversal of cumulative revenue will not occur. Given the lack of access to the health plans’ data and control over the members assigned to APC, the adjustments and/or the withheld amounts are unpredictable and as such APC’s risk share revenue is deemed to be fully constrained until APC is notified of the amount by the health plan. Final settlement of risk pools for a given contract year generally occur in the third or fourth quarter of the following year.
In addition to risk-sharing revenues, the Company also receives incentives under “pay-for-performance” programs for quality medical care, based on various criteria. As an incentive to control enrollee utilization and to promote quality care, certain HMOs have designed the quality incentive programs and commercial generic pharmacy incentive programs to compensate the Company for efforts it takes to improve the quality of services and for efficient and effective use of pharmacy supplemental benefits provided to the HMOs' members. The incentive programs track specific performance measures and calculate payments to the Company based on the performance measures. Incentives earned under “pay-for-performance” programs are recognized using the most likely amount methodology. However, as the Company does not have sufficient insight from the health plans on the amount and timing of the shared risk pool and incentive payments, these amounts are considered to be fully constrained and only recorded when such payments are known and/or received.
Generally, for the foregoing arrangements, the final settlement is dependent on each distinct day’s performance within the annual measurement period, but cannot be allocated to specific days until the full measurement period has occurred and performance can be assessed. As such, this is a form of variable consideration estimated at contract inception and updated through the measurement period (i.e. the contract year), to the extent the risk of reversal does not exist and the consideration is not constrained.
NGACO AIPBP Revenue
APAACO and CMS entered into a Next Generation ACO Model Participation Agreement (the “Participation Agreement”) with an initial term of two performance years through December 31, 2018, which has been extended for another two renewal years.
For each performance year, the Company shall submit to CMS its selections for risk arrangement; the amount of the profit/loss cap; alternative payment mechanism; benefits enhancements, if any; and its decision regarding voluntary alignment under the NGACO Model. The Company must obtain CMS consent before voluntarily discontinuing any benefit enhancement during a performance year.
Under the NGACO Model, CMS aligns beneficiaries to the Company to manage (direct care and pay providers) based on a budgetary benchmark established with CMS. The Company is responsible for managing medical costs for these beneficiaries. The beneficiaries will receive services from physicians and other medical service providers that are both in-network and out-of-network. The Company receives capitation from CMS on a monthly basis to pay claims from in-network providers. The Company records such capitation received from CMS as revenue as the Company is primarily responsible and liable for managing the patient care and for satisfying provider obligations, is assuming the credit risk for the services provided by in-network providers through its arrangement with CMS, and has control of the funds, the services provided and the process by which the providers are ultimately paid. Claims from out-of-network providers are processed and paid by CMS and the Company’s shared savings or losses in managing the services provided by out-of-network providers are generally determined on an annual basis after reconciliation with CMS. Pursuant to the Company’s risk share agreement with CMS, the Company will be eligible to receive the savings or be liable for the deficit according to the budget established by CMS based on the Company’s efficiency in managing how the beneficiaries aligned to the Company by CMS are served by in-network and out-of-network providers. The Company’s savings or losses on providing such services are both capped by CMS, and are subject to significant estimation risk, whereby payments can vary significantly depending upon certain patient characteristics and other variable factors. Accordingly, the Company recognizes such surplus or deficit upon substantial completion of reconciliation and determination of the amounts. The Company records NGACO capitation revenues monthly. Excess over claims paid plus an estimate for the related IBNR (see Note 8) and monthly capitation received are deferred and recorded as a liability until actual claims are paid or incurred. CMS will determine if there were any excess capitation paid for the performance year and the excess is refunded to CMS. Further, in accordance with the guidance in ASC 606-10-55-36 through 55-40 on principal versus agent considerations, the Company records such revenues in the gross amount of consideration.
For each performance year, CMS shall pay the Company in accordance with the alternative payment mechanism, if any, for which CMS has approved the Company; the risk arrangement for which the Company has been approved by CMS; and as otherwise provided in the Participation Agreement. Following the end of each performance year and at such other times as may be required under the Participation Agreement, CMS will issue a settlement report to the Company setting forth the amount of any shared

21

Table of Contents

savings or shared losses and the amount of other monies. If CMS owes the Company shared savings or other monies, CMS shall pay the Company in full within 30 days after the date on which the relevant settlement report is deemed final, except as provided in the Participation Agreement. If the Company owes CMS shared losses or other monies owed as a result of a final settlement, the Company shall pay CMS in full within 30 days after the relevant settlement report is deemed final. If the Company fails to pay the amounts due to CMS in full within 30 days after the date of a demand letter or settlement report, CMS shall assess simple interest on the unpaid balance at the rate applicable to other Medicare debts under current provisions of law and applicable regulations. In addition, CMS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury may use any applicable debt collection tools available to collect any amounts owed by the Company.
The Company participates in the AIPBP track of the NGACO Model. Under the AIPBP track, CMS estimates the total annual expenditures for APAACO’s assigned patients and pays that projected amount to the Company in monthly installments, and the Company is responsible for all Part A and Part B costs for in-network participating providers and preferred providers contracted by the Company to provide services to the assigned patients
As APAACO does not have sufficient insight into the financial performance of the shared risk pool with CMS because of unknown factors related to IBNR, risk adjustment factors, stop loss provisions, among other factors, an estimate cannot be developed. Due to these limitations, APAACO cannot determine the amount of surplus or deficit that will likely be recognized in the future and therefore this shared risk pool revenue is considered fully constrained.
For performance year 2018, the Company received monthly AIPBP payments at a rate of approximately $7.3 million per month from CMS that started in February 2018, which was reduced to $5.5 million per month beginning October 1, 2018. The Company will need to continue to comply with all terms and conditions in the Participation Agreement and various regulatory requirements to be eligible to participate in the AIPBP mechanism and/or NGACO Model. The Company continues to be eligible in receiving AIPBP payments under the NGACO Model for performance year 2019, with the effective date of the performance year beginning April 1, 2019. The monthly AIPBP payments received by the Company for performance year 2019 was approximately $8.3 million per month for the period beginning April 1, 2019 through August 30, 2019. Subsequently, CMS adjusted the AIPBP payments to approximately $3.7 million for the period starting September 1, 2019 based on CMS' updated estimate of total claims to be incurred. The Company has received approximately $45.0 million in total AIPBP payments for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 of which $36.5 million has been recognized as revenue. The Company also recorded assets of approximately $11.4 million related to recoverable claims paid during the nine months ended September 30, 2019 which will be administered following instructions from CMS and $3.0 million related to final settlement of the 2017 performance year. These balances are included in “Other receivables” in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet.
Management Fee Income
Management fee income encompasses fees paid for management, physician advisory, healthcare staffing, administrative and other non-medical services provided by the Company to IPAs, hospitals and other healthcare providers. Such fees may be in the form of billings at agreed-upon hourly rates, percentages of revenue or fee collections, or amounts fixed on a monthly, quarterly or annual basis. The revenue may include variable arrangements measuring factors such as hours staffed, patient visits or collections per visit against benchmarks, and, in certain cases, may be subject to achieving quality metrics or fee collections. The Company recognizes such variable supplemental revenues in the period when such amounts are determined to be fixed and therefore contractually obligated as payable by the customer under the terms of the respective agreement. The Company’s Management Services Agreement ("MSA") revenue also includes revenue sharing payments from the Company’s partners based on their non-medical services.
The Company provides a significant service of integrating the services selected by the Company’s clients into one overall output for which the client has contracted. Therefore, such management contracts generally contain a single performance obligation. The nature of the Company’s performance obligation is to stand ready to provide services over the contractual period. Also, the Company’s performance obligation forms a series of distinct periods of time over which the Company stands ready to perform. The Company’s performance obligation is satisfied as the Company completes each period’s obligations.
Consideration from management contracts is variable in nature because the majority of the fees are generally based on revenue or collections, which can vary from period to period. The Company has control over pricing. Contractual fees are invoiced to the Company’s clients generally monthly and payment terms are typically due within 30 days. The variable consideration in the Company’s management contracts meets the criteria to be allocated to the distinct period of time to which it relates because (i) it is due to the activities performed to satisfy the performance obligation during that period and (ii) it represents the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled.
The Company’s management contracts generally have long terms (e.g., ten years), although they may be terminated earlier under the terms of the respective contracts. Since the remaining variable consideration will be allocated to a wholly unsatisfied promise

22

Table of Contents

that forms part of a single performance obligation recognized under the series guidance, the Company has applied the optional exemption to exclude disclosure of the allocation of the transaction price to remaining performance obligations.
Fee-for-Services Revenue
FFS revenue represents revenue earned under contracts in which the Company bills and collects the professional component of charges for medical services rendered by the Company’s contracted physicians and employed physicians. Under the FFS arrangements, the Company bills the hospitals and third-party payors for the physician staffing and further bills patients or their third-party payors for patient care services provided and receives payment. FFS revenue related to the patient care services is reported net of contractual allowances and policy discounts and are recognized in the period in which the services are rendered to specific patients. All services provided are expected to result in cash flows and are therefore reflected as net revenue in the condensed consolidated financial statements. The recognition of net revenue (gross charges less contractual allowances) from such services is dependent on such factors as proper completion of medical charts following a patient visit, the forwarding of such charts to the Company’s billing center for medical coding and entering into the Company’s billing system and the verification of each patient’s submission or representation at the time services are rendered as to the payor(s) responsible for payment of such services. Revenue is recorded based on the information known at the time of entering of such information into the Company’s billing systems as well as an estimate of the revenue associated with medical services.
The Company is responsible for confirming member eligibility, performing program utilization review, potentially directing payment to the provider and accepting the financial risk of loss associated with services rendered, as specified within the Company’s client contracts. The Company has the ability to adjust contractual fees with clients and possess the financial risk of loss in certain contractual obligations. These factors indicate the Company is the principal and, as such, the Company records gross fees contracted with clients in revenues.
Consideration from FFS arrangements is variable in nature because fees are based on patient encounters, credits due to clients and reimbursement of provider costs, all of which can vary from period to period. Patient encounters and related episodes of care and procedures qualify as distinct goods and services, provided simultaneously together with other readily available resources, in a single instance of service, and thereby constitute a single performance obligation for each patient encounter and, in most instances, occur at readily determinable transaction prices. As a practical expedient, the Company adopted a portfolio approach for the FFS revenue stream to group together contracts with similar characteristics and analyze historical cash collections trends. The contracts within the portfolio share the characteristics conducive to ensuring that the results do not materially differ under the new standard if it were to be applied to individual patient contracts related to each patient encounter. Accordingly, there was no change in the Company's method to recognize revenue under ASC 606 from the previous accounting guidance.
Estimating net FFS revenue is a complex process, largely due to the volume of transactions, the number and complexity of contracts with payors, the limited availability at times of certain patient and payor information at the time services are provided, and the length of time it takes for collections to fully mature. These expected collections are based on fees and negotiated payment rates in the case of third-party payors, the specific benefits provided for under each patient's healthcare plans, mandated payment rates in the case of Medicare and Medicaid programs, and historical cash collections (net of recoveries) in combination with expected collections from third party payors.
The relationship between gross charges and the transaction price recognized is significantly influenced by payor mix, as collections on gross charges may vary significantly, depending on whether and with whom the patients the Company provides services to in the period are insured and the Company's contractual relationships with those payors. Payor mix is subject to change as additional patient and payor information is obtained after the period services are provided. The Company periodically assesses the estimates of unbilled revenue, contractual adjustments and discounts, and payor mix by analyzing actual results, including cash collections, against estimates. Changes in these estimates are charged or credited to the consolidated statement of income in the period that the assessment is made. Significant changes in payor mix, contractual arrangements with payors, specialty mix, acuity, general economic conditions and health care coverage provided by federal or state governments or private insurers may have a significant impact on estimates and significantly affect the results of operations and cash flows.
Contract Assets
Typically, revenues and receivables are recognized once the Company has satisfied its performance obligation. Accordingly, the Company’s contract assets are comprised of receivables and receivables – related parties. Generally, the Company does not have material amounts of other contract assets.
The Company's billing and accounting systems provide historical trends of cash collections and contractual write-offs, accounts receivable agings and established fee adjustments from third-party payors. These estimates are recorded and monitored monthly

23

Table of Contents

as revenues are recognized. The principal exposure for uncollectible fee for service visits is from self-pay patients and, to a lesser extent, for co-payments and deductibles from patients with insurance.
Contract Liabilities (Deferred Revenue)
Contract liabilities are recorded when cash payments are received in advance of the Company’s performance, or in the case of the Company’s NGACO, the excess of AIPBP capitation received and the actual claims paid or incurred. The Company’s contract liability balance was $17.0 million and $9.1 million as of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively, and is presented within “Accounts payable and accrued expenses” in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, $0.5 million of the Company’s contract liability accrued in 2018 has been recognized as revenue.
Leases
On January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASU 2016-2, “Leases (Topic 842).” Refer to “Recent Accounting Pronouncements” below and to Note 16 – Leases for further details.
The Company determines if an arrangement is a lease at inception. Operating leases are included in “Right-of-use assets” and “Operating lease liabilities” in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Finance leases are included in “Land, property and equipment, net” and “Finance lease liabilities” in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.
Operating lease ROU assets and operating lease liabilities are recognized based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at commencement date. As none of the Company's leases provide an implicit rate, the Company uses its incremental borrowing rate based on the information available at commencement date in determining the present value of future payments. The Company's lease terms may include options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that it will exercise that option. Lease expense for minimum lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.
Income Taxes
Federal and state income taxes are computed at currently enacted tax rates less tax credits using the asset and liability method. Deferred taxes are adjusted both for items that do not have tax consequences and for the cumulative effect of any changes in tax rates from those previously used to determine deferred tax assets or liabilities. Tax provisions include amounts that are currently payable, changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities that arise because of temporary differences between the timing of when items of income and expense are recognized for financial reporting and income tax purposes, changes in the recognition of tax positions and any changes in the valuation allowance caused by a change in judgment about the realizability of the related deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance is established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to amounts expected to be realized.
The Company uses a recognition threshold of more-likely-than-not and a measurement attribute on all tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return in order to be recognized in the condensed consolidated financial statements. Once the recognition threshold is met, the tax position is then measured to determine the actual amount of benefit to recognize in the condensed consolidated financial statements.
Share-Based Compensation
The Company maintains a stock-based compensation program for employees, non-employees, directors and consultants. The value of share-based awards such as options is recognized as compensation expense on a cumulative straight-line basis over the vesting period of the awards, adjusted for expected forfeitures. From time to time, the Company issues shares of its common stock to its employees, directors and consultants, which shares may be subject to the Company’s repurchase right (but not obligation) that lapses based on time-based and performance-based vesting schedules.
The Company accounts for share-based awards granted to persons other than employees and directors under ASC 505-50 Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees. As such the fair value of such shares of stock is periodically re-measured using an appropriate valuation model and income or expense is recognized over the vesting period.
Basic and Diluted Earnings Per Share
Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing net income attributable to holders of the Company’s common stock by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the periods presented. Diluted earnings per share is computed using the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding plus the effect of dilutive securities

24

Table of Contents

outstanding during the periods presented, using the treasury stock method. Refer to Note 14 for a discussion of shares treated as treasury shares for accounting purposes.
Noncontrolling Interests
The Company consolidates entities in which the Company has a controlling financial interest. The Company consolidates subsidiaries in which the Company holds, directly or indirectly, more than 50% of the voting rights, and VIEs in which the Company is the primary beneficiary. Noncontrolling interests represent third-party equity ownership interests (including certain VIEs) in the Company’s consolidated entities. The amount of net income attributable to noncontrolling interests is disclosed in the condensed consolidated statements of income.
Mezzanine Equity
Pursuant to APC’s shareholder agreements, in the event of a disqualifying event, as defined in the agreements, APC could be required to repurchase the shares from the respective shareholders based on certain triggers outlined in the shareholder agreements. As the redemption feature of the shares is not solely within the control of APC, the equity of APC does not qualify as permanent equity and has been classified as mezzanine or temporary equity. Accordingly, the Company recognizes noncontrolling interests in APC as mezzanine equity in the condensed consolidated financial statements. APC’s shares are not redeemable and it was not probable that the shares would become redeemable as of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-2, “Leases (Topic 842)” (“ASC 842”), which amends the existing accounting standards for leases to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by requiring the recognition of ROU assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet. Most prominent among the changes in the standard is the recognition of ROU assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases. Under the standard, disclosures are required to meet the objective of enabling users of financial statements to assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases.
The Company adopted ASC 842 effective January 1, 2019 using the following practical expedients as permitted under the transition guidance within the new standard; (i) not reassess whether any expired or existing contracts are or contain leases; not reassess the lease classification for any expired or existing leases; not reassess initial direct costs for existing leases; and (ii) use hindsight in determining the lease term and in assessing impairment of the entity’s ROU assets. The Company has also implemented additional internal controls to enable future preparation of financial information in accordance with ASC 842.
The standard had a material impact on our consolidated balance sheets, but did not materially impact our consolidated results of operations and had no impact on cash flows. The most significant impact was the recognition of ROU assets of $9.0 million and lease liabilities of $8.9 million for operating leases, while our accounting for finance leases remained substantially unchanged. The 2018 comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect for that period (ASC 840). Refer to Note 16 – Leases for further details.
ASC 842 provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company elected: (1) the “package of practical expedients”, which permits it not to reassess under the new standard its prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification, and initial direct costs, and (2) the use-of-hindsight in determining the lease term and in assessing impairment of ROU assets. In addition, ASC 842 provides practical expedients for an entity’s ongoing accounting that the Company has elected, comprised of the following: (1) the election for classes of underlying asset to not separate non-lease components from lease components, and (2) the election for short-term lease recognition exemption for all leases that qualify. Refer to Note 16 – Leases for further details.
In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326)-Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments” (“ASU 2016-13”). The new standard requires entities to measure all expected credit losses for financial assets held at the reporting date based on historical experience, current conditions and reasonable and supportable forecasts. ASU 2016-13 will become effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact ASU 2016-13 will have on the condensed consolidated financial statements.
In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-11, “Earnings Per Share (Topic 260): Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480); Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): (Part 1) Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features, (Part II) Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Non-controlling Interests with a Scope Exception” (“ASU 2017-11”). The amendments in Part I of this update change the classification analysis of certain equity-linked financial instruments (or embedded features) with down round features. When determining whether certain financial instruments should be classified as liabilities or equity

25

Table of Contents

instruments, a down round feature no longer precludes equity classification when assessing whether the instrument is indexed to an entity’s own stock. The amendments also clarify existing disclosure requirements for equity-classified instruments. The amendments in Part 1 of this update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in any interim period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. The Company adopted ASU 2017-11 on January 1, 2019. The adoption of ASU 2017-11 did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.
In October 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-17, “Consolidation (Topic 810): Targeted Improvements to Related Party Guidance for Variable Interest Entities” (“ASU 2018-17”). This ASU reduces the cost and complexity of financial reporting associated with consolidation of variable interest entities (VIEs). A VIE is an organization in which consolidation is not based on a majority of voting rights. The new guidance supersedes the private company alternative for common control leasing arrangements issued in 2014 and expands it to all qualifying common control arrangements. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently assessing the impact the adoption of ASU 2018-17 will have on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.
With the exception of the new standards discussed above, there have been no other new accounting pronouncements that have significance, or potential significance, to the Company’s financial position, results of operations and cash flows.
3.
Business Combination and Goodwill
Alpha Care Medical Group
On May 31, 2019, APC and APC-LSMA completed their acquisition of 100% of the capital stock of Alpha Care from Dr. Kevin Tyson for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $45.1 million in cash, subject to post-closing adjustments. As part of the transaction the Company deposited $2.0 million into an escrow account for potential post-closing adjustments. As of September 30, 2019 no post-closing adjustment is expected to be paid to Dr. Tyson and the full amount of the escrow account is expected to be returned to the Company. As such, the escrow amount is presented within Prepaid expenses and other current assets in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.
The following table summarizes the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, as of the acquisition date:
 
Preliminary
Balance Sheet
Assets acquired
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
3,568,554

Accounts receivable, net
10,335,664

Other current assets
2,004,649

Network relationship intangible assets
29,858,000

Goodwill
24,637,507

Accounts Payable
(2,273,753
)
Deferred tax liabilities
(8,355,343
)
Medical liabilities
(14,719,714
)
    Net assets acquired
$
45,055,564

 
 
Cash paid
$
45,055,564


Accountable Health Care, IPA
On August 30, 2019, APC and APC-LSMA, acquired the remaining outstanding shares of capital stock (comprising 75%) in Accountable Health Care in exchange for $7.3 million. In addition to the payment of $7.3 million APC assumed all assets and liabilities of Accountable Health Care, including loans payable to NMM and APC of $15.4 million, which has been eliminated upon consolidation and contributed the 25% investment totaling $2.4 million, total purchase price was $25.1 million (see Note 5).

26

Table of Contents

The following table summarizes the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed, as of the acquisition date:
 
Preliminary
Balance Sheet
Assets acquired
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
581,965

Accounts receivable, net
5,150,060

Other current assets
198,056

Network relationship intangible assets
11,411,000

Goodwill
25,604,917

Accounts Payable
(2,993,325
)
Deferred tax liabilities
(3,193,209
)
Medical liabilities
(11,684,658
)
Subordinated Loan
(15,408,138
)
Net asset acquired
$
9,666,668

 
 
Equity investment contributed
$
2,416,668

Cash paid
$
7,250,000

The Company also completed one additional acquisition on September 10, 2019 for total consideration of $1.7 million, of which $0.4 million was in the form of APC common stock. The business combination did not meet the quantitative thresholds to require separate disclosures based on the Company's consolidated net assets, investments and net income.
The acquisitions were accounted for under the purchase method of accounting. The purchase consideration of the acquired company was allocated to acquired tangible and intangible assets and liabilities based upon their fair values. The excess of the purchase consideration over the fair value of the net tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired were recorded as goodwill. The determination of the fair value of assets and liabilities acquired requires the Company to make estimates and use valuation techniques when market value is not readily available. The results of operations of the company acquired have been included in the Company's financial statements from the date of acquisition. Transaction costs associated with business acquisitions are expensed as they are incurred.
At the time of acquisition, the Company estimates the amount of the identifiable intangible assets based on a valuation and the facts and circumstances available at the time. The Company determines the final value of the identifiable intangible assets as soon as information is available, but not more than 12 months from the date of acquisition.
Goodwill is not deductible for tax purposes.
The change in the carrying value of goodwill for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 is as follows;
Balance, January 1, 2019
$
185,805,880

 
 
Acquisition of Alpha Care
24,637,507

Acquisition of AMG
1,086,468

Acquisition of Accountable Health Care
25,604,917

 
 
Balance, September 30, 2019
$
237,134,772




27

Table of Contents

4.
Intangible Assets, Net
At September 30, 2019, the Company’s intangible assets, net, consisted of the following:
 
Useful
Life
(Years)
 
Gross
September 30,
2019
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
September 30,
2019
Indefinite lived assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Medicare license
N/A
 
$

 
$

 
$

Amortized intangible assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Network relationships
11-15
 
151,152,000

 
(57,503,773
)
 
93,648,227

Management contracts
15
 
22,832,000

 
(9,146,391
)
 
13,685,609

Member relationships
12
 
6,696,000

 
(2,086,523
)
 
4,609,477

Patient management platform
5
 
2,060,000

 
(755,333
)
 
1,304,667

Tradename/trademarks
20
 
1,011,000

 
(92,675
)
 
918,325

 
 
 
$
183,751,000

 
$
(69,584,695
)
 
$
114,166,305

At December 31, 2018, the Company’s intangible assets, net, consisted of the following:
 
Useful
Life
(Years)
 
Gross
December 31,
2018
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
December 31,
2018
Indefinite lived assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Medicare license
N/A
 
$
1,994,000

 
$

 
$
1,994,000

Amortized intangible assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Network relationships
11-15
 
109,883,000

 
(48,361,773
)
 
61,521,227

Management contracts
15
 
22,832,000

 
(7,447,581
)
 
15,384,419

Member relationships
12
 
6,696,000

 
(1,289,667
)
 
5,406,333

Patient management platform
5
 
2,060,000

 
(446,333
)
 
1,613,667

Tradename/trademarks
20
 
1,011,000

 
(54,763
)
 
956,237

 
 
 
$
144,476,000

 
$
(57,600,117
)
 
$
86,875,883

Included in depreciation and amortization on the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income is amortization expense of $4.3 million and $4.2 million (excluding $0.1 million of amortization expense for exclusivity incentives) for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and $12.0 million and $12.8 million (excluding $0.3 million of amortization expense for exclusivity incentives) for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively.
During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019, the Company wrote off indefinite-lived intangible assets of $2.0 million related to Medicare licenses it acquired as part of the Merger. The Company will no longer utilize these licenses and as such the Company will not receive future economic benefits.
Future amortization expense is estimated to be as follows for the following years ending December 31:
 
Amount
 
 
2019 (excluding the nine months ended September 30, 2019)
$
4,212,000

2020
15,757,000

2021
14,436,000

2022
13,559,000

2023
12,341,000

Thereafter
53,861,000

 
 
Total
$
114,166,000


28

Table of Contents



5.
Investments in Other Entities - Equity Method
Equity Method Investment Summary
Investments in other entities – equity method consisted of the following:
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
LaSalle Medical Associates – IPA Line of Business
$
6,426,903

 
$
7,054,888

Pacific Medical Imaging & Oncology Center, Inc.
1,542,506

 
1,359,494

Universal Care, Inc.
8,794,659

 
2,635,945

Accountable Health Care - related party

 
4,977,957

Diagnostic Medical Group
2,714,008

 
2,257,346

Pacific Ambulatory Surgery Center, LLC

 
285,198

531 W. College, LLC – related party
16,139,073

 
16,273,152

MWN, LLC – related party
222,956

 
33,000

 
$
35,840,105

 
$
34,876,980

LaSalle Medical Associates - IPA Line of Business
Founded by Dr. Albert Arteaga in 1996, LaSalle Medical Associates (“LMA”) operates four neighborhood medical centers employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults and seniors in San Bernardino County, California. LMA’s patients are primarily served by Medi-Cal. LMA is also an IPA of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality care to more than 319,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare Counties. During 2012, APC-LSMA and LMA entered into a share purchase agreement whereby APC-LSMA invested $5.0 million for a 25% interest in LMA’s IPA line of business. NMM has a management services agreement with LMA. APC accounts for its investment in LMA under the equity method as APC has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control over LMA’s operations. For the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, APC recorded losses and income from this investment of $0.4 million and $0.2 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. For the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, APC recorded losses from this investment of $2.8 million and $0.8 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. During the period ended September 30, 2019, the Company contributed $2.1 million to LMA as part of its 25% interest. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balance of $6.4 million and $7.1 million at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.
LMA’s summarized balance sheets at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 and summarized statements of operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 with respect to its IPA line of business are as follows:
Balance Sheets
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
3,237,833

 
$
18,444,702

Receivables, net
7,778,735

 
2,897,337

Other current assets
3,526,319

 
5,459,442

Loan receivable
2,250,000

 
1,250,000

Restricted cash
680,216

 
667,414

 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
17,473,103

 
$
28,718,895


29

Table of Contents

Liabilities and Stockholders’ (Deficit) Equity
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Current liabilities
$
22,953,961

 
$
26,837,814

Stockholders’ (deficit) equity
(5,480,858
)
 
1,881,081

 
 
 
 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ (deficit) equity
$
17,473,103

 
$
28,718,895

Statements of Operations
 
Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2019
 
Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2018
Revenues
$
144,569,818

 
$
177,696,760

Expenses
155,581,757

 
180,445,655

 
 
 
 
Net loss
$
(11,011,939
)
 
$
(2,748,895
)
Pacific Medical Imaging and Oncology Center, Inc.
Incorporated in California in 2004, PMIOC provides comprehensive diagnostic imaging services using state-of-the-art technology. PMIOC offers high quality diagnostic services such as MRI/MRA, PET/CT, CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, digital x-rays, bone densitometry and digital mammography at its facilities.
In July 2015, APC-LSMA and PMIOC entered into a share purchase agreement whereby APC-LSMA invested $1.2 million for a 40% ownership interest in PMIOC.
Pursuant to an Ancillary Service Contract with APC, PMIOC provides covered services on behalf of APC to enrollees under APC's health plans. Under the Ancillary Service Contract, APC paid PMIOC fees of approximately $0.7 million and $0.7 million, for the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and fees of approximately $2.1 million and $1.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. APC accounts for its investment in PMIOC under the equity method of accounting as APC has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control over PMIOC’s operations. During the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, APC recorded income from this investment of approximately $31,230 and $4,990, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. For the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, APC recorded income from this investment of $0.2 million and $41,571, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balances of $1.5 million and $1.4 million at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.
Universal Care, Inc.
UCI is a privately held health plan that has been in operation since 1985. UCI holds a license under the California Knox-Keene Health Care Services Plan Act to operate as a full-service health plan. UCI contracts with CMS under the Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug Program.
On August 10, 2015, UCAP purchased 100,000 shares of UCI class A-2 voting common stock from UCI for $10.0 million, which shares comprise 48.9% of UCI's total outstanding shares and 50% of UCI’s voting common stock. APC accounts for its investment in UCI under the equity method of accounting as APC has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control over UCI’s operations. During the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company recorded income and losses from this investment of approximately $0.6 million and $4.6 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, the Company recorded income and losses from this investment of approximately $6.2 million and $2.9 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balances of $8.8 million and $2.6 million at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.

30

Table of Contents

UCI’s balance sheets at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 and statements of income for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:
Balance Sheets
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
$
29,568,915

 
$
27,812,520

Receivables, net
62,787,671

 
46,978,703

Other current assets
33,786,968

 
18,670,350

Other assets
10,799,827

 
661,621

Property and equipment, net
3,319,680

 
2,786,996

 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
140,263,061

 
$
96,910,190

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Current liabilities
$
120,698,226

 
$
89,731,133

Other liabilities
25,067,577

 
25,024,043

Stockholders’ deficit
(5,502,742
)
 
(17,844,986
)
 
 
 
 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ deficit
$
140,263,061

 
$
96,910,190

Statements of Income
 
Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2019
 
Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2018
Revenues
$
372,181,425

 
$
240,633,955

Expenses
370,597,312

 
246,765,335

 
 
 
 
Income before benefit from income taxes
1,584,113

 
(6,131,380
)
Benefit from income taxes
(11,010,394
)
 
(130,023
)
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
$
12,594,507

 
$
(6,001,357
)
Accountable Health Care – Related Party
Accountable Health Care is a California professional medical corporation that has served the local community in the greater Los Angeles County area through a network of physicians and health care providers for more than 20 years. Accountable Health Care currently has a network of over 400 primary and 700 specialty care physicians, and five community and regional hospital medical centers that provide quality health care services to more than 89,000 members of three federally qualified health plans and multiple product lines, including Medi-Cal, Commercial, Medicare and Healthy Families.
On September 21, 2018, APC and NMM each exercised their option to convert their respective $5.0 million loans into shares of Accountable Health Care capital stock (see Note 6). As a result, APC’s $5.0 million loan was converted into a 25% equity interest with the remaining $5.0 million loan held by NMM to be converted into an equity interest that will be determined based on a third party valuation of Accountable Health Care’s current enterprise value. APC accounts for its investment in Accountable Health Care under the equity method of accounting. On August 30, 2019 APC and APC-LSMA, in connection with the settlement of a dispute with Dr. Jayatilaka, acquired the remaining outstanding shares of capital stock (comprising 75%) in Accountable Health

31

Table of Contents

Care in exchange for $7.3 million. In addition to the payment of $7.3 million APC assumed all liabilities and assets of Accountable Health Care (See Note 3).
The Company recognized a gain of approximately $1.8 million as a result of the transaction , which represented the difference between the fair value of the 25% ownership held and the Company's basis at the time of acquisition. Such gain is included in income from equity method investment in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income.
Effective September 1, 2019, Accountable Health Care's financial result is included in the condensed consolidated balance sheets as of September 30, 2019 and the condensed consolidated statements of income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019.
Diagnostic Medical Group
On May 14, 2016, David C.P. Chen M.D., Inc., a California professional corporation doing business as Diagnostic Medical Group (“DMG”), David C.P. Chen M.D., individually and APC-LSMA, entered into a share purchase agreement whereby APC-LSMA acquired a 40% ownership interest in DMG for total cash consideration of $1.6 million.
APC accounts for its investment in DMG under the equity method of accounting as APC has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control over DMG’s operations. For the three months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, APC recorded income from this investment of $0.3 million and $0.2 million, respectively, in the condensed consolidated statements of income. For the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018, APC recorded income from this investment of $0.7 million and $0.9 million, respectively, in the condensed consolidated statements of income. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019 the Company received dividends from its investment in DMG of $0.2 million. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balances of $2.7 million and $2.3 million as of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.
Pacific Ambulatory Surgery Center, LLC
PASC, a California limited liability company, is a multi-specialty outpatient surgery center that is certified to participate in the Medicare program and is accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care. PASC has entered into agreements with healthcare service plans, IPAs, medical groups and other purchasers of healthcare services for the provision of outpatient surgery center services to health plan subscribers and enrollees. On November 15, 2016, PASC and APC, entered into a membership interest purchase agreement whereby PASC sold 40% of its aggregate issued and outstanding membership interests to APC for total consideration of $0.8 million.
During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, the Company recognized an impairment loss of $0.3 million related to its investment in PASC as the Company does not believe it will recover its investment balance. Such impairment loss is included in loss from equity method investment in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income.
APC accounted for its investment in PASC under the equity method of accounting as APC has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control over PASC’s operations. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018, APC recorded income from this investment of $0.1 million and $0.3 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balance of $0.3 million as of December 31, 2018.
531 W. College LLC – Related Party
In June 2018, College Street Investment LP, a California limited partnership (“CSI”), APC and NMM entered into an operating agreement to govern the limited liability company, 531 W. College, LLC and the conduct of its business, and to specify their relative rights and obligations. CSI, APC and NMM, each owns 50%, 25% and 25%, respectively, of member units based on initial capital contributions of $16.7 million, $8.3 million, and $8.3 million, respectively.
On June 29, 2018, 531 W. College, LLC closed its purchase of a non-operational hospital located in Los Angeles from Societe Francaise De Bienfaisance Mutuelle De Los Angeles, a California nonprofit corporation, for a total purchase price of $33.3 million. On April 23, 2019, NMM and APC entered into an agreement whereby NMM assigned and APC assumed NMM's 25% membership interest in 531 W. College, LLC for approximately $8.3 million. Subsequently, APC has a 50% ownership in 531 W. College LLC with a total investment balance of approximately $16.1 million.
APC accounts for its investment in 531 W. College, LLC under the equity method of accounting as APC has the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control over the operations of this joint venture. APC's investment is presented as an investment in other entities - equity method in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet as of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

32

Table of Contents

For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019, APC recorded losses from its investment in 531 W. College LLC of $0.1 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balance of $16.1 million and $16.3 million, respectively, related to APC’s investment at September 30, 2019 and APC's and NMM's investments at December 31, 2018.
531 W. College LLC’s balance sheets at September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018 and statements of operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and 2018 are as follows:
Balance Sheet
 
September 30,
2019
 
December 31,
2018
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
$
31,986

 
$
158,088

Other current assets
24,750

 
16,137

Other assets
70,000

 
70,000

 
 
 
 
Property and equipment, net
$
33,412,652

 
$
33,394,792

 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
33,539,388

 
$
33,639,017

 
 
 
 
Liabilities and Members’ Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
$
1,261,243

 
$
1,007,413

Stockholders’ equity
32,278,145

 
32,631,604

 
 
 
 
Total liabilities and members’ equity
$
33,539,388

 
$
33,639,017

Statements of Operation
 
Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2019
 
Nine Months
Ended
September 30,
2018
Revenues

 

Expenses
779,958

 
181,359

Loss from operations
(779,958
)
 
(181,359
)
 
 
 
 
Other Income
$
426,500

 
$
25,650

 
 
 
 
Net loss
$
(353,458
)
 
$
(155,709
)
MWN LLC – Related Party
On December 18, 2018, NMM, 6 Founders LLC, a California limited liability company doing business as Pacific6 Enterprises (“Pacific6”), and Health Source MSO Inc., a California corporation (“HSMSO”) entered into an operating agreement to govern MWN Community Hospital, LLC and the conduct of its business and to specify their relative rights and obligations. NMM, Pacific6, and HSMSO each owns 33.3% of the membership shares based on each member’s initial capital contributions of $3,000 and working capital contributions of $30,000. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, NMM invested an additional $0.3 million for working capital purposes. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019, APC recorded losses from its investment in MWN LLC of $0.1 million, respectively, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of income. The accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets include the related investment balance of $0.2 million and $33,000 as of September 30, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.

33

Table of Contents

Investment in privately held entity that does not report net asset value per share
MediPortal, LLC
In May 2018, APC purchased 270,000 membership interests of MediPortal LLC, a New York limited liability company, for $0.4 million or $1.50 per membership interest, which represented an approximately 2.8% ownership interest. In connection with the initial purchase, APC received a 5-year warrant to purchase an additional 270,000 membership interests. Additionally, APC received a 5-year option to purchase an additional 380,000 membership interests and a 5-year warrant to purchase 480,000 membership interests, which MediPortal LLC will grant APC upon completion of its health portal. As of September 30, 2019, the health portal has not been completed. As APC does not have the ability to exercise significant influence, and lacks control,